The Mull of Galloway

The Mull of Galloway is Scotland’s most southerly point which I have visited by now twice. It has also been featured on ‘Coast’ which is an amazing series that I’d recommend to everyone. But, the sight which is featured is similarly awesome.

‘Coast’ is there because of the fog horn – a historic means of warning on misty coastlines to keep people from a potential danger. The Celtic Sea, after all, in its time claimed many a victim, and the RNLI was also founded on the same coasts.

I was there for both — checking out the southernmost point of Scotland as well as seeing the fog horn.

The confluence of currents

One of the more memorable places there are the two platforms overlooking the sea, both of which illustrate the ferocity with which the two primary currents meet. It is all very poetic.

The sunset I saw in February underlined all that even more:

The lighthouse on the Mull of Galloway

Review: Stormlord Rising

Stormlord Rising
Stormlord Rising by Glenda Larke
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Good stories poorly written seem to be a bit of a theme as of late. The story here, indeed, keeps on being interesting. The plot is overall a bit more innovative than the first book, which is only good. Indeed, the author also seems to have slightly given up on her tendency to feature every plot twist fifty pages ahead, settling mostly for about ten or five in this volume. One can only hope that this entirely disappears in the next book.

However, even with the above in mind, the story is weighed down by a lot of problems. The main one of these would be, for me, the number of contradictions in the world the story takes place in. The religious systems of the various factions are an example of this, but there are many others: the “‘Baster” accent is another one of the very annoying things, where an entire race (nation? faction?) is differentiated by the fact they use a single tense wrong and always say “Ye” instead of “You”. I mean… surely, the author could have thought of something more? Something imaginative perhaps?

The characters are likewise shallow and meaningless. Ryka’s ridiculous adventures strain my patience with the number of u-turns she goes through, especially with every fourth thought of hers being the same; Davim and his successor are fools, having no grasp of strategy or planning; Tarquar is ‘evil’ because he is bored (what a jolly good reason!); Terelle’s thoughts are articulated as if she was five; etc. The only person with a modicum of moral complexity is our stormlord, who is thereby also rendered incapable of acting. Overall, the only character who has managed to maintain being interesting is Iani.

I will only add here that I will read the third book, more because of I don’t like not knowing what’s going to happen rather than looking forward to the book, but that’s that.

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