Araiši Lake Dwelling

I had been hoping to visit Araiši ever since I read about a 9th century lake dwelling having been reconstructed there. Of course, reconstructions have their own downsides — potentially misunderstanding archaeological remains and such — but even so they can present a uniquely wonderful picture of the preceding centuries/millennia. Araiši, dating to the pre-Christian era of these lands, was even more of a sightseeing target for this reason.

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Pirita Convent

Pirita is an iconic neighbourhood of Tallinn, and it’s convent — in all of its many forms — has often been used as a cultural icon. It is also, therefore, typical to find oneself thinking whether to stop by. I did so on one summer’s day, and I really enjoyed my visit. However, from what was visible there, a look into the place’s history beforehand (or after) won’t go amiss. Continue reading “Pirita Convent”

Binham Priory

I never expected to be visiting Binham but it was on the way. Or, rather, what I saw from the window of my car was that a ruined structure was rising up from the horizon on my right so I decided to stop and go for a walk. It’s a mighty sight to behold, and my poor camera’s representation of it is such: Continue reading “Binham Priory”

Creake Abbey

Creake’s history in effect spans not more than about three centuries, but in it we may find our historic senses of justice and injustice renewed. The small abbey (most of the walls are still standing but the cloister is now a private garden and cannot be visited) was originally founded as sir Robert de Nerford’s private chapel in 1206 and converted into a hospital in 1217. Its status as an ecclesiastical edifice was confirmed slightly later and from 1231, the King, in the person of Henry III, was Creake’s patron.

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Dilham Hall

I will start by saying I did not even try and approach Dilham because it is a private property. The original fortfified structure was added to, with the resultant edifice being the hall that’s extant today. What I did do was take a look around the general area, and think about the people who started with the constructions here — the 15th century is what background info suggests for the fortifications and the manor/hall-building.

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Thornage Hall

I can safely say that I won’t say very much about Thornage Hall. Really, I wouldn’t visit it unless one was a keen fan of the Bishops of Norvich (Norvic) and their history as this was an ecclesiastical site. The present building dates to the late 15th century and Bishop James Goldwell.

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North Elmham Priory & Castle

I really enjoyed visiting North Elmham. The site can be summed up as the vision of two very different people, Bishops Herbert de Losinga and Henry le Despenser. The former built a stone chapel (to replace earlier timber edifices) in the early 12th century and the latter converted it into a castle approximately in 1388. One on top of another, the ruins don’t really allow for easy differentiation but I guess that a bishop’s castle residence is as holy as his chapel. Continue reading “North Elmham Priory & Castle”

Review: ‘The Ancient Paths’, Graham Robb

The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic EuropeThe Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe by Graham Robb
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This could all be a complete fallacy and nothing in here be true, but there’s a limit beyond which one stops believing in coincidences and trust that this could have been an actual fact. ‘The Ancient Paths’ and the theories postulated here crosses that limit for me. Continue reading “Review: ‘The Ancient Paths’, Graham Robb”

Castle Acre Priory

Castle Acre is one of those places most people in Norfolk are slightly aware of and, yet, have perhaps never visited. If this is the case (or indeed if you are in Cambridgeshire or Lincolnshire) then one should do so at the first possible option, and let not even the promise of a rainy day hold you back. Such a day was exactly the one where I walked into the grounds of the former Castle Acre Priory, having never visited it before (much unlike the castle area itself where I’d been twice before). Continue reading “Castle Acre Priory”

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